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Putting Green to Work

Putting Green to Work

“We are in dire need of a new approach to investing in America’s clean water and drinking water infrastructure”. American Rivers 2011 finds that need for funding for “green” projects is far greater than the 20% provided for this effort. States have substantial lists of green projects that lack funding. Within the overall category of “green” we identified a group of projects providing a comprehensive set of environmental and economic benefits. Model states (New York and Maryland) shall be studied by others. States must act quickly to remove statutes and regulations to pursue integrated approaches to bright green infrastructure, and the benefits wished to be seen must be written into project evaluation criteria. Read more from Putting Green to Work: Economic Recovery Investments for Clean and Reliable Water.

Colorado CWSRF IUP

Colorado CWSRF IUP

Colorado’s long-term goals aim to improve, maintain and/or restore water quality for priority water bodies. The agencies will continue to review the effectiveness of the priority scoring model (Attachment I) and use of additional subsidy. Notable lists include the Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund 2021 Project Eligibility List in Appendix A, and the Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund 2021 Project Priority / Fundable List in Appendix B. Read on for specifics on the proposed federal fiscal year 2021 federal bill requirements, such as green project reserve; additional subsidy; Davis-Bacon and related acts; American iron and steel requirements; architectural and engineering procurement requirements; generally accepted accounting principles; fiscal sustainability planning; project cost and effectiveness evaluation; and project signage. The loan principal amount for disadvantaged communities is up to $3 million per project. As of June 30 2020 there are 103 Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund direct loans totaling $112,179,994 and 111 disadvantaged community loans totaling $78,856,394 administered or are currently being administered by the state. Approximately $81 million of grant and re-loan funds are available for loans for the remainder of 2020 and into 2021.

Wyoming CWSRF IUP

Wyoming CWSRF IUP

See the attached Wyoming CWSRF IUP FY 2021. Attachments II (wastewater treatment system projects) and IV (non-point source projects) identify the projects most likely to apply for CWSRF funds in FY2020 or that are expected to complete the remaining steps on conditional funding awards by the end of FY2020 or in FY2021. Their total estimated cost is $93,990,000. Attachment V lists projects proposed for non-point source remediation/corrective actions at leaking underground storage tank (LUST) sites for FY2021. Their total estimated cost is $8,332,695. Historically, the State has been able to fund all projects which actually do apply for loan funding, and it expects to be able to continue to do so during FY2021, though not all applicants will be likely to receive the full amount of principal forgiveness for which they apply.

South Carolina CWSRF Priority Ranking System

South Carolina CWSRF Priority Ranking System

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) is the designated state agency to apply for and administer the capitalization grant for South Carolina’s CWSRF. The South Carolina Budget and Control Board (BCB) Office of Local Governments conducts financial functions of the CWSRF, establishes financial policies and executes loans to project sponsors. DHEC and the BCB distribute funds through low-interest loans and principal forgiveness loans. The following priority ranking system shares the first question that DHEC will ask: “how will the project help enhance water quality?” followed by everything else you’ll need to know about the SCCWSRF. EPA has identified seven priority watersheds in South Carolina. Both EPA and DHEC will prioritize the use of discretionary resources in these areas: Saluda, Middle Savannah, Black Creek, Sewee-Santee, May River, Okatie River, and Lower Edisto. The Priority Ranking Criteria is split into sections that show the state’s and nation’s priorities (Will the project address a water quality impairment of a waterbody that is identified on the current 303(d) list?)

South Carolina CWSRF IUP

South Carolina CWSRF IUP

South Carolina’s allotment from the federal appropriations for federal fiscal year (FFY) 2020 is $16,280,000. The Clean Water Provisional Projects List (PPL) (Appendix A) page 15 identifies projects that are considered to be eligible and ready to proceed in the SFY 2021. When selecting projects for funding, DHEC may bypass projects on the Comprehensive Priority List as follows, reserving the right to convert CWSRF to DWSRF funding and vice versa as the state sees fit, and enforcing a sustainability requirement for sponsors. Municipalities, counties, special purpose districts and other public entities are eligible SRF project sponsors. In addition to eligibilities, the IUP covers state match requirement and administration of funds available. To make maximum benefit of PF funds for SFY 2021, no one sponsor may receive more than $1,000,000 of this subsidy unless PF funds remain unassigned or are not committed to an identified project as expected.

South Carolina GPR Guidance

South Carolina GPR Guidance

Projects that are not considered “categorical” may still qualify for the GPR. Such “business case” projects must be evaluated for their eligibility within one of the four targeted types of GPR eligible projects based upon a business case argument. The business case should provide a cost/benefit analysis, estimated project life and payback period, supporting calculations, and any supporting documentation. See the following excerpt from EPA’s GPR guidance to learn more about how to present a business case for a potential SRF project. Business cases will be approved by the State, required as long as “green projects” are a priority with the EPA. An approved business case must be included in the State’s project files (as of 2013) and contain clear documentation that the project achieves identifiable and substantial benefits. The following sections provide guidelines for business case development.

Oklahoma GPR Checklist

Oklahoma GPR Checklist

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) loan program’s GPR checklist is a tool to aid loan applicants and consultants in determining the green components of any given project, identifying both green performance targets and submittal materials that will be used for the implementation of the green components. It is also a tool to aid OWRB staff in tracking the implementation of the GPR throughout Oklahoma. It is the applicant’s responsibility to obtain the necessary approvals and permits, and to properly design, build and effectively operate and maintain the proposed facilities covered in the Engineering Report (ER) or planning document. Loan applicants should include a completed copy of the checklist with their ER, provided in this report.

Oklahoma CWSRF IUP

Oklahoma CWSRF IUP

The Oklahoma CWSRF 2020 Intended Use Plan (IUP) brought to you by the Financial Assistance Division (FAD) and Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB). The FAD assists communities in their efforts to protect and conserve Oklahoma’s water resources for current and future generations through cost effective financial products, technical assistance, and high quality customer service. To date, they have funded over $4.2 billion in projects with their loan and grant programs which in turn led to savings of over $1.4 billion for Oklahoma communities and rural districts. Oklahoma project forgiveness structure is a phased format to assist eligible recipients in communities with a population of 3,300 or less. Phase I funding is for planning and design that results in a Permit to Construct on an eligible project. Phase II requires evidence to confirm a Permit to Construct has been submitted on an eligible project and may be eligible for up to $200,000 or 50% of eligible costs, whichever is lower. To date, for SFY 2020 the OWRB has received requests for 19 projects totaling $96,729,307 (Table 2). Funding requests for the 5-year period (through year 2024) total $232,775,984. See the Project Priority List (PPL) for project details. There are 7 steps to the CWSRF program; programmatic application process (see the project priority list on page 14), financial application process, engineering review, environmental review, OWRB approval and closing, construction and monitoring, and loan monitoring. GPR, additional subsidies, and additional fund goals follow.

Massachusetts CWSRF Application Packet

Massachusetts CWSRF Application Packet

Massachusetts Clean Water Trust, Office of the Treasurer and Receiver, General Executive Office for Administration and Finance, and the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) collaborate pertaining to the application for financial assistance; CWSRF construction phase 2020. This package includes the application forms, instructions and other information relative to supporting documentation required to be submitted as part of the application. See changes from FY 2019 in the affordability criteria, housing choice, disadvantaged business enterprise (DBE) goals, and fiscal sustainability planning. Note necessary documentation, and supplemental requirements. Starting page 15, part I of the form begins, leading into appendix files.

Massachusetts SRF Application Guidance

Massachusetts SRF Application Guidance

The clean Water State Revolving Fund of 2021 Project Construction Evaluation Form Instructions and Guidance give contact information and deadlines to follow, by the Department of Environmental Protection. Definitions and examples are given for all the necessary applicant and project identification and certification information, project schedules and cost, project evaluation process, and project ranking processes. Expect project effectiveness and environmental benefit to be prioritized in this MassDEP guide.

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