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Webinar: Leveraging SRFs

Click the video below to watch WaterNow June 24, 2021, Leveraging State Revolving Funds for Innovative Water Infrastructure Investments webinar.

Webinar Slides: Leveraging SRFs

Leveraging State Revolving Funds for Innovative Water Infrastructure Investments

Click the link below to download the slides from WaterNow's June 24, 2021, State Revolving Fund webinar.

Colorado CWSRF IUP

Colorado CWSRF IUP

Colorado’s long-term goals aim to improve, maintain and/or restore water quality for priority water bodies. The agencies will continue to review the effectiveness of the priority scoring model (Attachment I) and use of additional subsidy. Notable lists include the Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund 2021 Project Eligibility List in Appendix A, and the Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund 2021 Project Priority / Fundable List in Appendix B. Read on for specifics on the proposed federal fiscal year 2021 federal bill requirements, such as green project reserve; additional subsidy; Davis-Bacon and related acts; American iron and steel requirements; architectural and engineering procurement requirements; generally accepted accounting principles; fiscal sustainability planning; project cost and effectiveness evaluation; and project signage. The loan principal amount for disadvantaged communities is up to $3 million per project. As of June 30 2020 there are 103 Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund direct loans totaling $112,179,994 and 111 disadvantaged community loans totaling $78,856,394 administered or are currently being administered by the state. Approximately $81 million of grant and re-loan funds are available for loans for the remainder of 2020 and into 2021.

Wyoming CWSRF IUP

Wyoming CWSRF IUP

See the attached Wyoming CWSRF IUP FY 2021. Attachments II (wastewater treatment system projects) and IV (non-point source projects) identify the projects most likely to apply for CWSRF funds in FY2020 or that are expected to complete the remaining steps on conditional funding awards by the end of FY2020 or in FY2021. Their total estimated cost is $93,990,000. Attachment V lists projects proposed for non-point source remediation/corrective actions at leaking underground storage tank (LUST) sites for FY2021. Their total estimated cost is $8,332,695. Historically, the State has been able to fund all projects which actually do apply for loan funding, and it expects to be able to continue to do so during FY2021, though not all applicants will be likely to receive the full amount of principal forgiveness for which they apply.

South Carolina CWSRF Priority Ranking System

South Carolina CWSRF Priority Ranking System

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) is the designated state agency to apply for and administer the capitalization grant for South Carolina’s CWSRF. The South Carolina Budget and Control Board (BCB) Office of Local Governments conducts financial functions of the CWSRF, establishes financial policies and executes loans to project sponsors. DHEC and the BCB distribute funds through low-interest loans and principal forgiveness loans. The following priority ranking system shares the first question that DHEC will ask: “how will the project help enhance water quality?” followed by everything else you’ll need to know about the SCCWSRF. EPA has identified seven priority watersheds in South Carolina. Both EPA and DHEC will prioritize the use of discretionary resources in these areas: Saluda, Middle Savannah, Black Creek, Sewee-Santee, May River, Okatie River, and Lower Edisto. The Priority Ranking Criteria is split into sections that show the state’s and nation’s priorities (Will the project address a water quality impairment of a waterbody that is identified on the current 303(d) list?)

South Carolina CWSRF IUP

South Carolina CWSRF IUP

South Carolina’s allotment from the federal appropriations for federal fiscal year (FFY) 2020 is $16,280,000. The Clean Water Provisional Projects List (PPL) (Appendix A) page 15 identifies projects that are considered to be eligible and ready to proceed in the SFY 2021. When selecting projects for funding, DHEC may bypass projects on the Comprehensive Priority List as follows, reserving the right to convert CWSRF to DWSRF funding and vice versa as the state sees fit, and enforcing a sustainability requirement for sponsors. Municipalities, counties, special purpose districts and other public entities are eligible SRF project sponsors. In addition to eligibilities, the IUP covers state match requirement and administration of funds available. To make maximum benefit of PF funds for SFY 2021, no one sponsor may receive more than $1,000,000 of this subsidy unless PF funds remain unassigned or are not committed to an identified project as expected.

Oklahoma CWSRF IUP

Oklahoma CWSRF IUP

The Oklahoma CWSRF 2020 Intended Use Plan (IUP) brought to you by the Financial Assistance Division (FAD) and Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB). The FAD assists communities in their efforts to protect and conserve Oklahoma’s water resources for current and future generations through cost effective financial products, technical assistance, and high quality customer service. To date, they have funded over $4.2 billion in projects with their loan and grant programs which in turn led to savings of over $1.4 billion for Oklahoma communities and rural districts. Oklahoma project forgiveness structure is a phased format to assist eligible recipients in communities with a population of 3,300 or less. Phase I funding is for planning and design that results in a Permit to Construct on an eligible project. Phase II requires evidence to confirm a Permit to Construct has been submitted on an eligible project and may be eligible for up to $200,000 or 50% of eligible costs, whichever is lower. To date, for SFY 2020 the OWRB has received requests for 19 projects totaling $96,729,307 (Table 2). Funding requests for the 5-year period (through year 2024) total $232,775,984. See the Project Priority List (PPL) for project details. There are 7 steps to the CWSRF program; programmatic application process (see the project priority list on page 14), financial application process, engineering review, environmental review, OWRB approval and closing, construction and monitoring, and loan monitoring. GPR, additional subsidies, and additional fund goals follow.

Massachusetts CWSRF Application Packet

Massachusetts CWSRF Application Packet

Massachusetts Clean Water Trust, Office of the Treasurer and Receiver, General Executive Office for Administration and Finance, and the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) collaborate pertaining to the application for financial assistance; CWSRF construction phase 2020. This package includes the application forms, instructions and other information relative to supporting documentation required to be submitted as part of the application. See changes from FY 2019 in the affordability criteria, housing choice, disadvantaged business enterprise (DBE) goals, and fiscal sustainability planning. Note necessary documentation, and supplemental requirements. Starting page 15, part I of the form begins, leading into appendix files.

Massachusetts SRF Application Guidance

Massachusetts SRF Application Guidance

The clean Water State Revolving Fund of 2021 Project Construction Evaluation Form Instructions and Guidance give contact information and deadlines to follow, by the Department of Environmental Protection. Definitions and examples are given for all the necessary applicant and project identification and certification information, project schedules and cost, project evaluation process, and project ranking processes. Expect project effectiveness and environmental benefit to be prioritized in this MassDEP guide.

Massachusetts CWSRF IUP

Massachusetts CWSRF IUP

The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) is pleased to present the Calendar Year 2020 Intended Use Plan (IUP), which details the projects, borrowers and amounts that will be financed through the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) loan program. Massachusetts is offering approximately $495 million to finance clean water projects across the Commonwealth. As noted in Table 1, approximately $420 million will fund 41 new construction projects, $59 million will be allocated towards funding five previously approved multiyear projects, and an additional $7.6 million will finance ten planning projects. A total of $3 million has been allocated to the emergency set-aside account, and $5 million will be directed to the Community Septic Management Program to remediate failed septic systems in participating communities. Eleven proposals, totaling approximately $2 million, as shown in Table 2, have been selected to receive financial assistance for their Asset Management plans.

Kansas WPCSRF IUP

Kansas WPCSRF IUP

The State of Kansas Intended Use Plan (IUP) for the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) is prepared in accordance with the provisions of Title VI of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act. This IUP describes the intended uses for all funds available in the Kansas CWSRF program for SFY 2021 and an overview of how the state will comply with federally mandated requirements. The FFY 2020 federal capitalization grant awarded June 26, 2020, is $14,344,000. In SFY 2021, Kansas expects to finance many wastewater collection and treatment projects and continue to pursue funding stormwater infrastructure and nonpoint source pollution control projects, while also meeting the federal requirements to provide 10% of FFY 2020 appropriation ($1,434,400) to GPR designs and provide the required additional subsidization. Kansas has developed short‐term and long‐term goals for the KWPCRF program. The status of these goals will be discussed in the annual report, for example, “Fund green infrastructure, water and energy efficiency and environmentally innovative projects”. The Kansas Project Priority Ranking System is found in Appendix E. The Priority Ranking System has not been updated since the 2019 Intended Use Plan.

Georgia CWSRF IUP 2020

Georgia CWSRF IUP 2020

The Georgia Environmental Finance Authority (GEFA) was created by the Georgia General Assembly in 1986 as the successor agency to the Georgia Development Authority Environmental Facilities Program. GEFA serves as the central state agency for assisting local governments in financing the construction, extension, rehabilitation and replacement, and securitization of public works facilities. This IUP outlines Georgia’s proposed uses of the FY2019 CWSRF allotment of $26,869,000. The CWSRF comprehensive list (Attachment 1) includes clean water projects submitted during the pre-application solicitation period. The comprehensive list is comprised of the community, the project score, the population, the total project cost, whether or not the borrower is eligible for principal forgiveness, and a description of the project. The CWSRF fundable project list with an estimated disbursement schedule is located in Attachment 2. The fundable list contains projects GEFA has identified as ready to move forward, which can be seen in the score column in Attachment 1. GEFA currently offers CWSRF loans to local governments and authorities at an interest rate of 50 basis points (0.50 percent) below the benchmark rate.

Georgia CWSRF Solicitation for Projects

Georgia CWSRF Solicitation for Projects

Call for 2020 CWSRF projects from (GEFA) Georgia finance authority! Types of projects eligible for CWSRF funding include, but are not limited to, projects that maintain compliance with wastewater rules and regulations, and improve water quality. The following project submission guidelines and program requirements answer common questions about who can apply to CWSRF loans, the minimum criteria for eligibility, eligible projects, and what qualifies for nonpoint source projects. Affordability criteria (median household income population trend and unemployment percent) is listed, followed by a detailed breakdown of the CWSRF scoring system.

Georgia CWSRF Application Guidance

Georgia CWSRF Application Guidance

Georgia’s CWSRF guidance for project requirements is laid out as follows: Planning document requirements, environmental review and planning documentation, environmental category information, plans and specifications, program policies, disadvantage business enterprises (DBE) solicitation guidelines, DBE review, and land acquisition requirements. A brief planning document should be developed to compare and analyze feasible alternatives for wastewater treatment and other Clean Water SRF-funded projects. The document must compare the costs of each alternative as well as environmental and other relevant non-monetary issues. Environmental categories are: wetlands, floodplains, water supply/water quality, water resources, groundwater recharge area, storm water, wastewater, air quality, solid wastes, soil stability, protected mountains, protected species, critical habitats, historical sites, and more. 21 policies under water quality projects are covered starting on page 23.

West Virginia CWSRF IUP

West Virginia CWSRF IUP

The West Virginia FY2021 CWSRF Intended Use Plan is organized into funds identification, goals, project priority list, fund activities, assurances, criteria and method for distribution of funds, public participation, and the agreement. The Department of Environmental Protection aims to efficiently and effectively carry out the State’s environmental laws and regulations that are designed to provide and maintain a healthful environment consistent with the economic benefits derived from strong agricultural, manufacturing, tourism and energy-producing industries. This year’s Clean Water Act Title VI funding allocation for West Virginia is $24,773,000. Green Project Reserve categories are as follows: energy efficiency, water efficiency, storm water, and environmentally innovative. See page 21 for a comprehensive 2021 priority project list.

Rhode Island CWSRF IUP

Rhode Island CWSRF IUP

Rhode Island Infrastructure Bank (the Bank) is pleased to submit to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) the Intended Use Plan (IUP) for all Clean Water Act (CWA), Title VI funds available to the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) including the Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2019 allotment of $10,669,000. The Bank agrees to provide, through methods available to it, the required State Matching Funds of $2,133,800 for the FFY 2019 Capitalization grant. The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (RIDEM) is responsible for establishing assistance priorities; assisting in the development of the IUP; maintaining the project priority list (PPL); determining project eligibility; performing technical project reviews; monitoring construction; review of project disbursements and project closeouts. The State reserves the right to transfer up to 33 % of the CWSRF Capitalization grant to the DWSRF or an equivalent amount from the DWSRF to the CWSRF. One of 12 long term goals is to continue to assist all prospective borrowers during all phases of project development, including the financing process. With the award of this grant in the amount of $10,669,000 plus the State Match of $2,133,800 for a total amount of $12,802,800, the Bank expects to fund all, or portions of the projects identified in Table 2 attached hereto (page 14).

New Mexico CWSRF IUP

New Mexico CWSRF IUP

The Fund is administered by the New Mexico Environment Department Construction Programs Bureau (NMED CPB) as agent for the Water Quality Control Commission (WQCC). State money is appropriated to NMED CPB to carry out the provisions of the Loan Act and is used to match Federal funds allocated to New Mexico pursuant to the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, also known as the Clean Water Act (CWA). During the 2020 Legislative Session held January 21, 2020 through February 20, 2020 the New Mexico Legislature appropriated $1,800,000 from the Public Projects Revolving Fund (PPRF) for state match funds for the FFY 2020 Allotment. This amount exceeds the required state match of $1,556,000. As of June 30, 2019, the audited current valuation (Total Net Position) of the CWSRF fund) was $332,360,451 allowing for $664,721 to be used for administration of the program in SFY21. Goals include to maintain the fiscal integrity of the CWSRF, and make funding available to potential borrowers who meet the criteria of one of the twelve CWSRF eligibilities found in Section 603(c) of the CWA as amended and as it applies to New Mexico.

New Mexico CWSRF Priority Criteria

New Mexico CWSRF Priority Criteria

It is the intent of the Projects Priority Ranking System for the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) to evaluate and rank projects that will mitigate point source discharges, such as discharges from wastewater treatment facilities (WWTF), and non-point source impacts to both surface and groundwater. In addition to evaluating project merits that will improve and protect water quality, the system will also evaluate each applicant’s level of financial need, local commitment to promoting sustainable utilities, and readiness to proceed with design and construction. Water quality improvement is comprised of the groundwater quality improvement factor and surface water quality improvement factor, as is the permit compliance category of the priority ranking system. The financial ranking is based on per capita income of the service area, rate structure, population served, and user fees. Sustainability is ranked based on the utility management plan, communal promotion of sustainable utilities, and longevity of the project. This is followed by a readiness to proceed rating and Green Project Reserve assessment.

Maryland WQSRF IUP

Maryland WQSRF IUP

The 2019 Intended Use Plan (IUP) is the document that the Maryland Water Quality Financing Administration (MWQFA) will submit to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to receive $38,429,000 in Federal Capitalization Grant to be matched with $7,685,800 (20%) in State funds FY2019. Sources and uses of funds, goals of Maryland water quality revolving loan fund (short and long term), project selection, project scope and environmental benefit, and minority business enterprises participation are considered. This year’s goals are 22% MBE (minority) and 16% WBE (women), an increase of 4% over the 34% goal applicable for the previous three-year period.

Iowa CWSRF IUP

Iowa CWSRF IUP

Iowa’s SRF has been recognized for offering some of the most innovative and far-reaching financing programs in the United States. The Intended Use Plans (IUPs) provide a roadmap to the policies and procedures of the SRF programs, along with the lists of projects and activities to be funded. In the last 30 years, Iowa’s SRF has provided more than $3.8 billion in loans for water and wastewater infrastructure, agricultural best management practices, and other water quality projects. Iowa’s SRF programs are highly rated in financial markets, giving the programs strong leveraging capacity to keep up with demand for loans. Table of Contents include FY 2021 plan of action, information on the CWSRF activities to be supported, assurances and specific proposals, criteria and method for distribution of funds, a project priority list, and the sponsored project application packet.

South Dakota CWSRF IUP

South Dakota CWSRF IUP

The primary purpose of the IUP is to identify the proposed annual intended use of the amounts available to the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (SRF). The IUP includes the following: list of projects and activities; goals, objectives, and environmental results; amount of funds transferred between the Clean Water SRF and the Drinking Water SRF; information on the activities to be supported; assurances and specific proposals; criteria and method for distribution of funds; and sources and uses of funds (the 2020 capitalization grant estimate used in the IUP is based on last year’s allocation). The long-term goals of the State Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund are to fully capitalize the Clean Water SRF, maintain or restore and enhance the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the state's waters for the benefit of the overall environment, protect public health, and promote economic well-being. The short-term goal of the Clean Water SRF is to fully capitalize the fund. Notable information include South Dakota having transferred $15,574,320 from the Clean Water SRF program to the Drinking Water SRF program in past years, and it is anticipated that approximately $100 million in leveraged bonds will be required in FFY 2020.

Mississippi CWSRF IUP

Mississippi CWSRF IUP

The Mississippi commission on environmental quality (CEQ) water pollution control revolving loan fund program (WPCRLF) FY 2020 intended use plan (IUP) is divided into part 1 (standard program details) and part 2 (additional federal requirements for FY2016 and after). The WPCRLF has 7 short term goals. For example “periodically consulting with financial advisors to develop revised operating policies and procedures for the WPCRLF (Fund), with the goal of maximizing investment in project loans and reducing idle cash, while maintaining proper stability and management of all aspects of the Fund”. Long term goals concern maintaining the SRF as a financially sound perpetuity, meeting the wastewater needs of the state, and the determination of an interest rate and loan repayment term which will generate sufficient fund income to meet the State's needs within a reasonable period of time, but which is more attractive than private sector funding.

Oregon CWSRF IUP 2021

Oregon CWSRF IUP 2021

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality prepares this Intended Use Plan as required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Oregon Administrative Rules to inform Oregonians and the Clean Water State Revolving Fund loan applicants about how DEQ proposes to use the fund during state fiscal year 2021. The following water quality improvement projects areas are: wastewater collection, treatment, water reuse and disposal systems; nonpoint source water pollution control projects; development and implementation of management plans for federally designated estuaries in Oregon (Tillamook Bay and Lower Columbia River). The program has a goal to assist communities in restoring, maintaining, and enhancing water quality by offering financial assistance for water pollution control, water quality improvement and protection projects. Funds aim to administer the Clean Water State Revolving Fund to ensure programmatic compliance with regulatory requirements, financial integrity, fund viability and perpetuity. Technical assistance includes assisting communities with the loan application and loan management process to meet regulatory requirements with federal and state requirements, water quality standards, utility, and financial management. Lastly, projects are to coordinate and collaborate with other state and federal programs to provide financial solutions for water quality improvements to Oregon public agencies.

Louisiana CWSRF IUP

Louisiana CWSRF IUP

This IUP is a required part of the process to request the Capitalization Grants, which will be matched with 20 percent in state matching funds. The FFY2020 grant allotment is $17,470,000 requiring $3,494,000 in state matching funds. This IUP describes LDEQ’s intended uses for all funds available in the CWSRF program FY 2019 and 2020. Since the program’s authorization, LDEQ has awarded over $1,164,850,669 in assistance to over 132 borrowers in 251 loan agreements, including projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to small and large municipalities. The Financial Services Division and Water Planning and Assessment Division within LDEQ are responsible for the operations of the CWSRF program in the State of Louisiana. The state of Louisiana has a goal to fund green infrastructure, water and energy efficiency and environmentally innovative projects in an amount that is at least ten percent of the capitalization grant for FY 2019 and 2020. Other goals include providing outreach to municipalities across the state of Louisiana and raising our interest rate as 1.95%. The ranking criteria emphasize high priority water bodies, projects proactively addressing needs, and projects addressing enforcement and compliance issues. In addition, projects receive extra consideration for implementation of green infrastructure, energy efficiency, water efficiency and environmental innovation.

Hawaii Brochure on Using SRF

Hawaii Brochure on Using SRF


Save Energy, Water and Money with State Revolving Fund Loans. Hawaii’s infographic emphasizes the state’s commitment to sustainability by focusing on eligible projects, features of the loan, and advice on getting more information. 15-30% energy savings can be achieved, alongside offers to extend equipment life, energy rebates, and the decrease in air pollutant emissions through ongoing projects.

Hawaii CWSRF IUP

Hawaii CWSRF IUP

Hawaii’s Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund (commonly referred to as the Clean Water State Revolving Fund or CWSRF) provides low interest loans to Hawaii’s four (4) counties to construct high priority wastewater, stormwater, and non-point source projects. Since its establishment in 1988, the program has issued over $1.031 billion in low interest loans, providing significant savings in interest costs to the counties. FY 2020 project selection will meet requirements according to AIS, FSP, GPR, cost effectiveness analysis, Davis-Bacon, Reporting, and additional subsidization standards. Disadvantaged communities will be directed funds. Other federal requirements include the single audit act, DBE compliance, and federal environmental crosscutters. States must first match funds in accordance with the cash draw ratio. Continued from 2015, Signage Guidelines for Hawaii -in accordance with nationwide EPA requirements- will further the state’s goals, alongside Hawaii’s affordability criteria protocol.

Alabama CWSRF Preapplication/Priority Criteria

Alabama CWSRF Preapplication/Priority Criteria

Applicants to the Alabama CWSRF will require Form 340. Project name, assistance requested, and loan applicant information should be collected alongside project engineer information, outside funding source information, community demographics, and factors used to rank the proposed project (the priority ranking system). Enforcement and compliance rating criteria, water quality improvement criteria, water/energy efficiency rating, stormwater management criteria, agricultural and nonpoint source pollution criteria, sustainability criteria, and growth criteria make up this section.

Alabama CWSRF IUP

Alabama CWSRF IUP

The State of Alabama will receive an EPA Capitalization Grant of $17,770,000 from EPA that will be used to provide low interest financial assistance for the CWSRF program. The 20% State matching fund requirement for the capitalization grant is $3,554,000 and will be fulfilled by an overmatch of State Match Bonds issued in previous years’ and a contribution from ADEM State Enforcement Action. FY 2020 Alabama CWSRF IUP aims to ensure compliance with the "first use" requirements which require that CWSRF assistance be available to projects which are members of the National Municipal Policy (NMP) universe; projects which have legally enforceable compliance schedules. Another goal: to provide CWSRF loans with additional subsidization in the form of principal forgiveness for not less than 10% ($1,777,000) of the CWSRF Capitalization Grant.

Utah WQ SRF IUP

Utah WQ SRF IUP

The primary purpose of the Plan is to identify current and projected projects that may be awarded funding from federal grant awards. The federal award for FY19 is estimated to be $8,443,000. Similar to other states, Green Project Reserve is a focal point of the IUP, and additional subsidization is provided to disadvantaged communities. For the Water Quality Board to qualify a community as disadvantaged, the community must have a demonstrated hardship based on its cost of sewer service relative to 1.4% of the MAGI, unemployment, poverty level, or economic trends. Utah short term goals include the collaboration with other agencies (e.g., Utah Permanent Community Impact Board, U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers) to sufficiently fund projects. The IUP also aims to solicit and fund eligible nonpoint source and storm water projects, and assist communities with all phases of a project, including sufficient planning, project design, environmental work, and construction.

Montana WPCSRF IUP

Montana WPCSRF IUP

The primary purpose of the Intended Use Plan (IUP) is to identify the proposed annual intended uses of the federal and state funds available to the Montana Water Pollution Control State Revolving Fund (WPCSRF) program. Montana’s WPCSRF federal capitalization grant for federal fiscal year 2020 is $7,780,000. A complete list of any and all eligible projects that are considered possible candidates for assistance from the WPCSRF program at this time can be found in Attachment I, the Project Priority List (PPL). FY 2021 lists 68 priority projects. Read on the Green Project Reserve and other assurances or specific proposals, such as Montana’s additional subsidization range (must use at least 10% and not more than 40% of the grant amount for AS).

Montana Funding Table with WPCSRF

Montana Funding Table with WPCSRF

Analyze Montana WPCSRF 2020 financial assistance programs for water, wastewater and solid waste projects by project name, eligible applicant, eligible project, cost status, available funds, loan repayment period, ranking criteria, funding deadline, additional information, and contact information.

Montana WPCSRF Priority Eligibility

Montana WPCSRF Priority Eligibility

This 2011 WPCSRF project priority list survey for proposed stormwater, non-point-source or wastewater system improvement needs, excluding operation & maintenance, and growth development requests contact information, median household income from the area, and a brief description of the proposed project.

Maine CWSRF IUP

Maine CWSRF IUP

The Department and the Maine Municipal Bond Bank (Bond Bank) jointly administer the Clean Water State Revolving Fund. Maine’s federal capitalization grant for 2020 is $12,302,000 and the required 20% state match is $2,460,400. Of the capitalization grant amount, the CWSRF is required to distribute $1,230,200 in additional subsidy to loan recipients and at its option, can provide up to $4,920,800 in total additional subsidies. The Department solicited projects from municipalities and districts to be ranked for funding offers containing principal forgiveness and received funding requests for 37 projects from loan applicants. A final PPL is available on page 14 containing 19 projects. Projects in this IUP are for renovations and improvements to publicly owned treatment works and appurtenant facilities, and for non-point source pollution abatement practices. The projects will maintain or restore compliance in many facilities and improve or protect water quality in others

Alaska CWSRF IUP

Alaska CWSRF IUP

In SFY20, the SRF Program plans to fully implement Micro Loans, offering loans up to $500,000 per project with terms of up to 20 years and principal forgiveness ranging from 50% to 90%. Pro Fi offers an alternative to project-by-project financing by funding eligible work within the utility’s capital improvement project portfolio for AWWU Anchorage Water and Wastewater Utility. With implementation of Pro Fi, the SRF Program can modify its approach to equivalency requirements in an effort to reduce the administrative burden on the majority of borrowers. ADEC has identified many goals, only one of which to “foster coordination with other programs and agencies to improve assistance to borrowers in their efforts to achieve compliance and improve water quality”. Expect additional subsidy definitions, priority criteria of point source projects, and the years’ project priority list to follow standard overview.

Alaska GPR CWSRF Assessment form

Alaska GPR CWSRF Assessment form

For projects to qualify as green, technical and financial aspects are assessed. The technical information can come from a variety of sources such as maintenance or operation records, engineering studies, project plans or other applicable documentation to identify problems. Expect to provide general information, project name location and type, green component costs and overall project costs.

Alaska SRF Loan Application Checklist

Alaska SRF Loan Application Checklist

Applying to Alaska’s revolving fund? See both CWSRF and DWSRF checklists. A checklist for loan applicants includes construction related files, drinking water specific information, and clean water specific information. An example resolution and ordinance are provided. To disclose lobbying activities, see page 7. The SRF Environmental Review checklist serves as a request for categorical exclusion. The following are the categories: historic properties, wetlands, floodplains, and contaminated sites.

New York CWSRF IUP

New York CWSRF IUP

Effective October 1 2020 – September 30 2021, the New York CWSRF Intended Use Plan provides guidelines for use. Recipients must comply with American Iron and Steel, Davis-Bacon and Related Acts federal wage rates, Equal Employment Opportunity, and Minority and Women Owned Business Enterprise (MWBE) participation. Allocation sources and uses of funds, Green Project Reserve requirements and more precede program goals. New York has committed FFY 2021 funds to projects that are in construction, ready to proceed with construction, or otherwise positioned to have funds disbursed quickly and steadily and advance both the environmental and economic goals of the State and the CWSRF to fund the highest priority water quality improvements as soon as needs arise. A long term goal is to provide financial assistance for projects that will protect groundwater, consistent with DEC’s goal to prevent pollution and protect the State’s groundwaters as a source of potable water supply.

New York CWSRF Project Scoring Criteria

New York CWSRF Project Scoring Criteria

The Environmental Facilities Corporation rates projects based on the following 6 factors: a critical source of pollution, water quality improvement, consistency with management plans, intergovernmental needs, financial need, and economic need. Water quality is given points according to Classification Points Factor (CPF), Impairment Factor (IF), and Potential Improvement Factor (PIF). Project Score Sheet included.

Michigan CWSRF IUP

Michigan CWSRF IUP

Michigan state’s FY 2021 CWSRF Strategic Water Quality Initiatives Fund drafts a summary of available funds, fund structure and advantages, as well as project priorities. The State’s annual Project Priority List (PPL) include projects from the past year which have been requested and delayed due to COVID-19 (nearly $200 million in projects). One long term goal is to increase awareness and use of the CWSRF programs to complete projects. A short term 2021 goal is to provide financing to the maximum number of applicants as possible including communities that have not utilized the CWSRF program in recent years.

Overview CWSRF Eligibilities 2016

Overview CWSRF Eligibilities

The paper is organized into project categories. Use the table of contents to quickly navigate to the category of interest. Beginning with CWSRF program eligibilities and ending with planning and assessment, the EPA Overview of CWSRF eligibilities from May 2016 offers a comprehensive look at eligibility guidelines and examples in each category (centralized waste treatment, energy conservation, water conservation, stormwater, Agricultural Best Management Practices, Decentralized Wastewater Treatment, Resource Extraction, contaminated sites, landfills, habitat protection and restoration, silviculture, desalination, groundwater protection and restoration, and surface water protection and restoration).

CWSRF Application Process Visual

CWSRF Application Process Visual

This California Clean Water State Revolving Fund infographic delineates a construction application process from planning phase, to estimating cost, to design and procurement, a final cost, finally to implementation, and final inspection/payment. It also illustrates the similar steps involved in the planning design application process.

California CWSRF IUP

California CWSRF IUP

California’s CWSRF has grown since financing its first project in 1989 and has executed more than $11.2 billion in financial assistance agreements with over 350 unique recipients. Approximately 96 percent (96%) of funds have been used for publicly owned wastewater infrastructure, and about four percent (4%) of funds have been used for nonpoint source or estuary projects. California has several goals, including to improve and protect groundwater quality in high-use basins by 2030, and increase sustainable local water supplies available for meeting existing and future beneficial uses. The CWSRF program supports the three goals of the California Water Action Plan: more reliable water supplies; the restoration of important species and habitat; and a more resilient, sustainably managed water resources system (water supply, water quality, flood protection, and environment) that can better withstand inevitable and unforeseen pressures in the coming decades. In the report, an “additional supplemental appropriations for disaster relief act 2019” may also be found, offering direction to address wildfires and hurricanes, and the State Water Board’s plan for supplemental intended use cases. The state has long and short term goals, to invest in small SDAC’s and small DAC’s disproportionately affected by pollution and water contamination, and provide funds for high-priority projects, respectively.

California CWSRF Official Policy

California CWSRF Official Policy

This Policy was written to implement the federal Clean Water Act’s (CWA) Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) Program in California. The Policy for Implementing the Clean Water State Revolving Fund addresses all project types eligible for CWSRF assistance. It is organized in order of project development, and it sets forth the requirements to obtain CWSRF financing. The CWSRF program provides financing for eligible projects concerning water restoration and maintaining water quality; additional objectives must be cost-effective and complement both the federal and state criteria and the policy goals of the State Water Board. Project primary and secondary scoring is depicted, including a readiness evaluation, community economic status, and financing due diligence. The official report delves into the disbursement of project funds, as well as appropriate, expected, project completion reports.

CWSRF 101 Presentation

CWSRF 101 Presentation

How did the CWSRF start? What is its structure? How about the flow of federal funds? Explanations on CWSRF infrastructure banks, the revolving and leveraged nature of funds, and project eligibility are addressed in the EPA’s CWSRF 2015 presentation. Also covered will be information on the Green Project Reserve, additional subsidization, fund financials, and cumulative assistance.

CWSRF Environmental Benefits 2014 Report

CWSRF Environmental Benefits 2014 Report

Results of a program having executed 35,000 assistance agreements to help protect and restore drinking water sources, wildlife habitat, recreational resources, and other beneficial uses. Eligible entities have been able to upgrade and repair wastewater treatment plants, correct combined and sanitary sewer overflows, and protect waterbodies from nonpoint sources of pollution. Of funding designated for the protection and restoration of impaired waters, 6,586 projects focused on aquatic life and wildlife. Concerning the support of surface water, we saw a focus on protection over restoration. Green project reserve accounted for 11 percent of total assistance in 2014. 95 percent of subsidies went to those who could not afford the project without said subsidy. $474 million emergency funds from CWSRF programs went to the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in accordance with the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act.

Review of Allotment of CWSRF Report

Review of Allotment of CWSRF Report

This Report to Congress presents the results of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) review of the current CWSRF allotment and its adequacy to address the water quality needs of eligible states, District of Columbia, and U.S. territories (collectively referred to as States). The 1987 Water Quality Act established the original allotment based on population, needs, and other factors that are complex and difficult to discern. Most States do not currently receive appropriated funds in proportion to their reported needs or population, which demonstrates the inadequacy of the current allotment. In chapter 3 the EPA provides possible options to update the allotment in the future. The report uses CWNS 2012 needs, 2010 resident population, water quality impairment component ratio, and the ratio of CWSRF assistance to federal capitalization to determine the allotments for all states. The report then provides several options, and several potential allotment formulas (such that needs are at least 50 percent of the formula, population is at least 30 percent, and the minimum allotment for states are 0.5 percent). The current allotment adequately reflects the water quality needs for only 14 States. To more adequately reflect changes over time, EPA recommends that Congress update the allotment on a regular schedule.

SRFs Up Annual Newsletter 2015

SRFs Up Annual Newsletter 2015

EPA is in the process of standardizing web content across all of its programs. As part of this effort, we are pleased to introduce a new and improved CWSRF website. EPA will distribute SRFs Up in August each year to state partners and other stakeholders, including Facebook and twitter. Updates will include projects of interest, water headlines, webinar series, and an annual report. Success stories include New York’s wastewater treatment, Arizona’s solar energy plan for their wastewater plant, land conservation in Virginia, and infrastructure planning guides in Oklahoma. EPA headquarter updates of an NIMS-CBR merger and CWSRF eligibilities compendium are accompanied by the announcement of further WRRDA Implementation training.

SRFs Up Annual Newsletter 2016

SRFs Up Annual Newsletter 2016

EPA’s Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) program is the nation’s largest federally supported water infrastructure program, providing over $118 billion in assistance since 1988. This issue will explore CWSRF assistance to small and disadvantaged communities – what we’re doing to serve them now and what we hope to accomplish in the future. We’ll examine data collected by our state partners and share a one-on-one conversation with CWSRF staff in the State of Nebraska to explore their program’s successes and discuss the challenges they face in serving disadvantaged communities. Along the way we will learn more about the activities of EPA’s new Water Infrastructure Resiliency and Finance Center (WIRFC), highlight successful CWSRF projects from around the country, and provide an overview of news and events at EPA.

SRFs Up Annual Newsletter 2018

SRFs Up Annual Newsletter 2018

CWSRF partnerships include a Nonpoint Source Program, the National Estuary Program, various partnerships for marketing and outreach, watershed financing partnerships, and the offices in the EPA concerning contaminated sites. Find 2018 PISCES Exceptional Projects, and headquarter updates included. Amongst which will include the modernization of the SRF database, and case studies of states that have successfully satisfied the Green Project Reserve through CWSRF financing. In 2018, the AIS program completed 35 site visits across 10 states. The site visits provide an opportunity for communities to ask project-specific AIS questions and receive EPA recommendations for improving their AIS documentation prior to project completion. Read on to hear more.

SRFs Up Annual Newsletter 2019

SRFs Up Annual Newsletter 2019

In recent years, SRFs have undertaken a variety of marketing and outreach efforts. This issue highlights several of these state activities and celebrates the success of these efforts. It answers questions such as “are flood control projects eligible for CWSRF assistance” or how can the CWSRF support water quality trading”. It discusses the five innovative financing mechanisms available to the CWSRFs: programmatic financing, portfolio financing, extended term financing, sponsorship financing, and co-financing. It also includes overviews of case studies such as Oklahoma’s marketing survey focus groups, and Kansas’ no-till cover crop agriculture NPS program. Further summarized are the 13 exceptional projects from 2019 under the CWSRF’s (PISCES) Performance and Innovation in the SRF Creating Environmental Success program. These are recognized projects that have demonstrated excellence in promoting EPA’s mission of protecting human health and the environment.

Annual Report: CWSRF Programs

Annual Report: CWSRF Programs

The largest source of public water-quality financing in the country, featuring flexible financing terms and subsidies, the CWSRF continuously allows communities to improve their wastewater treatment, sewer infrastructure, address nonpoint sources of pollution, and many other decentralized environmental benefits. This year (2015) the CWSRF provided $5.8 billion to eligible projects and will continue to grow, while prioritizing those with the biggest public health impact. This year, 64 percent of assistance agreements went to communities with fewer than 10,000 people. These recipients were offered a low interest rate at only 1.7 percent, reducing barriers for borrowers but lowering program revenues. This is met with low fiscal year administrative expenses. Financial highlights include a 4.6 percent increase in program equity from the previous year. 2015 has experienced an intake in funding of water conservation and stormwater programs focusing on green infrastructure and water efficiency, following the prior years’ Water Resources Reform and Development Act amendment to the CWSRF. The West states have the flexibility to focus on water reuse drought solutions, while Eastern states can manage stormwater challenges. Read some of the success stories included.

New York EPA SRF Sustainability Report

New York EPA SRF Sustainbaility Pilot Project Report

In 2008, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) estimates the repairing replacing and updating of New York’s wastewater infrastructure to be $36.2 billion over the next two decades. After receiving ARRA funding, the states’ CWC partnership has since raised awareness surrounding New York wastewater infrastructure. A stakeholder engagement advisory team recommends providing incentives for more sustainable projects, such as technical assistance, training, and pre-planning grants. The following report offers a review of the current state of New York’s SRF in respect to the state and the nation’s increased focus on energy efficiency, smart growth, and asset management whilst maintaining water quality. Overall, recommendations surround improving outreach and technical assistance, focusing on wastewater regionalization (without sprawl across local governments), and fairness of infrastructure funding across municipalities. For New York CWSRF eligibility, the Smart Growth Public Infrastructure Act of 2010 is a vehicle for addressing the concerts brought in this report.

California Sustainability Plan for CWSRF

California Sustainability Plan for CWSRF

This report focuses primarily on ways in which the California CWSRF program -despite currently being able to efficiently process applications for funding- might attract more applicants with sustainable projects “…by better coordination with existing statewide sustainability initiatives, strategic outreach efforts, and incentives”. The following major ongoing initiatives in California are proposed to have room for growth in sustainability: The California Strategic Growth Council, California State Planning Priorities, California Water Plan, California Regional Blueprints and Sustainable Communities Strategies, and Integration of CWSRF Program With State Planning Activities. These are followed with suggestions for incorporating sustainable practices across California CWSRF applicants (for example, supporting existing communities by focusing on repairs and upgrades to existing infrastructure). The current state of the given 11 sustainability goals are then summarized, alongside implementation opportunities and examples of policies and best practices from other states. After analysis, rather than increasing requirements to discourage less-sustainable applicants from applying, the DFA plans to reduce administrative hurdles, reaching out to sustainably-minded communities to increase their participation in CWSRF opportunities for funding.

 

Q+A on GPR and Additional Subsidy Requirements for SRF

Q+A on GPR and Additional Subsidy Requirements for SRF

A memorandum on the additional subsidization of Green Project Reserve provisions and the requirements for GPR in SRF programs, answers to questions previously posed for both the CWSRF and DWSRF programs are addressed. Wondering about the time frame for meeting additional subsidy requirements? Wonder if IUP must indicate which projects will receive additional subsidy, or whether the subsidy requirement for a project can be split between fiscal years? What documentation is required for proof of meeting additional subsidy expectations? Rather, must funding for GPR projects come directly from the capitalization grant? Read for questions answered, to date 2013.

CWSRF Eligibility Graphic

CWSRF Eligibility Graphic

Introducing the Clean Water State Revolving Fund, the nation’s solution for low-cost infrastructure financing since 1987! Read statistics and a bit about the EPA’s eligibility criteria. Through 2018 end of year, 39,948 loan agreements and a cumulative $133 billion in funding have been given. Apply for financing through your state’s CWSRF. The EPA funds eligible projects with an additional 20% funding coming from your state. CWSRF offers below-market average interest rates, around 1.5% with additional subsidies possible. Communities, private entities, nonprofit organizations, and citizen groups may all be eligible. Terms of state revolving funds typically last the life of the project if it doesn’t exceed 30 years, requiring repayment a year after completion of the project, and on average returning $3 to communities for every $1 of federal investment.

Funding Water Efficiency via SRF Programs

Funding Water Efficiency via SRF Programs Use state revolving funds for water efficiency. This saves money in the long run, avoiding expensive future projects and reducing “lost water”. Water efficiency also helps withstand droughts by decreasing demand of limited quality water, rendering drastic water policies unnecessary. By reducing waste and consumption, allow your community to step towards a more environmentally conscious future. You’ll do this by reducing wastewater flows, sustaining aquifers, and lessening pollution from saltwater intrusion. CWSRF and DWSRF programs work like banks offering loans for infrastructure improvements to protect public health. Florida implements water audit and leak detection to avoid excess costs and water wasted unnecessarily. To receive funding, contact your state DWSRF or CWSRF representative, to hear your states’ annual Intended Use Plan (IUP). Use specific ideas like installing water meters, water-efficient devices, funding incentive programs, installing dual pipe distribution systems, and educating the public.

Sustainability and the CWSRF: A Best Practices Guide

Sustainability and the CWSRF: A Best Practices Guide

Get an overview of state policies and practices, forwarding the goal of sustainably developed communities. You'll find policies, their program requirements and incentives, guidance on the planning process, project priority system structure, financial planning, and technical assistance. In conjunction with the CWSRF, applicable Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) policies are included. The EPA recommends big picture direction, such as focusing on revitalizing existing communities and infrastructure, as well as detailed facts: "for every 10% increase in forest cover of the source area, chemical and treatment costs decrease by 20%". Emphasis has been placed on utility goals to align with community priorities. Projects are evaluated on the basis of water quality, fiscal sustainability, and social criteria to choose the best solution. The Oregon program sets aside $3 million for funding planning projects while others prioritize funding construction on planning loans completed within 3 years. This helps disadvantaged and small communities. Failing septic and decentralization are many rural issues; new treatment can lead to inefficient patterns and water quality issues. Learn from the Minnesota case study who uses a hierarchy to analyze the best approach to fixing failed wastewater treatment systems, ensuring all alternatives are considered. Read from states like Arizona who encourage coordination across funding sources by creating workshops engaging in the community needing funding, New York which has a centralized database to obtain funding, and Kentucky which creates policy to bring government agencies of water, transportation and housing together to best plan for future development. CWSRF programs will either require or assist communities in making capital improvement plans inclusing comprehensive alternatives analysis and asset management plans to ensure informed decisions. Looking towards a more financially stable wastewater system, CWSRF programs will limit growth the program is willing to fund, focusing on repairing, replacing, and upgrading infrastructure. Likewise, the polluted areas of urban Brownfields sites can be redeveloped by coordinating with Brownfileds RLFs to reach common goals.

Financing GI: Best Practices for CWSRF

Financing Green Infrastructure: A Best Practices Guide for the CWSRF

Use this "best practices guide" to take advantage of the CWRSF's resources for your program to benefit, whether you're working on a local scale rain garden or large scale floodplains to reduce stormwater. To prevent communities from shying away from green infrastructure solutions due to hurdles such as unfamiliarity, the EPA offers this easy to read guideline for financing. This report will go over the basics; best practices, how to access said projects, relevant financial incentives, and priorities to be aware of. One of many financing opitons, the CWSRF is a nationwide historically proven instrument for change. The Green Project Reserve is a requirement to invest in green infrastructure; any project mitigating stormwater runoff is eligible. Successful state programs to be emulated include the following. South Carolina hired a ful time marketing expert to plan workshops and meet with stakeholders. Oklahoma created a document to step by step guide users how to take inventory and determine when they need replacing. New Hampshire decided to award 20 of 100 points to GPR projects, using a ranking system to prioritize projects. California is a good example of "Set-asides". They approved low interest financing to incentivize water recycling projects.

Environmental Benefits of CWSRF /GI

Environmental Benefits of CWSRF Green Infrastructure Projects

What are the goal and main benefits of green infrastructure? What do projects managing stormwater runoff look like? The EPA shares five case studies on CWSRF implementations for a taste of the environmental benefits of GI projects; despite their varying locations and problems, all make substantial differences in our national fight to prevent stormwater pollution.

2016 Annual Report: CWSRF Programs

2016 Annual Report: CWSRF Programs

Read on for the performance results of America's largest public source of water quality funding. From construction grants in the 70's to the 1987 establishment of the CWSRF, see the system of water infrastructure banks for eligible projects. The majority of CWSRF money goes towards traditional wastewater treatment projects, mostly publicly-owned treatment works. This is a testament to the success of federal state cooperation for the nation's environmental interests. This year (2016) the programs had a great year, extending 1,362 loans, providing $7.6 billion aid to eligible borrowers -the second largest amount in history. Low interest rates this year saved billlions; when market rate was 6%, CWSRF offered a 3% loan over 20 years. Additionally, funds have been dispersed timely and efficiently. Commitment and dispersion rates have increased, leading to cost savings. Health for communities and job creation are positive consequences of the fund's growth. The fund's total equity totaled $48.2 billion, a 3.9% increase from 2015. Leveraged bond proceeds were threefold from 2015, interest earnings over $1.2 billion.

2017 Annual Report: CWSRF Programs

2017 Annual Report: CWSRF Programs

2017 marks the 30th anniversary of a successful Clean Water State Revolving Fund program. Read about the history of the transition from grants to CWSRF, an environmental infrastructure bank, offering below market interest rates and "additional subsidization", to accomplish a cummulative assistance of $126B thus far. After recieivng federal funding, this allowed programs to receive additional state funding three times that of the allotted federal grant, and allowing each state to focus on their area of need. Over time, CWSRF has expanded eligibility, benefited smaller communities, focused on disadvantaged communities, and brought about the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund which was established based off of CWSRF success. The Clean Water Act requires annual financial overviews of the 51 CWSRF programs under GAAP reporting. Overall, leveraged bond and net assets increased, and $7.4B in funding for this year alone. Exceptional projects are recognized in the PISCES program which can be overviewed. Finally, see state agencies that are recipients of funding.

2018 Annual Report: CWSRF Programs

2018 Annual Report: CWSRF Programs

Read the 2018 report of CWSRF programs for an overview for the projects receiving state revolving fund assistance, and additional information such as the EPA's expanded eligibility from publicly owned treatment works to nonpoint source pollution. Learn from Vermont's strategy to utilize nonprofits to carry out SRF projects and improve ties with their program and the nonprofit community. NEP, National Estuary Programs, aiming to protect the water quality of 28 estuaries nationwide, implement long term plans (CCMP) and are also eligible for CWSRF financing. CWSRF funding may also be implementable through Watershed Financing partnerships on a project by project basis. The EPA CWSRF also encourages the use of asset management plans (AMP) as they improve the tracking of inventory, repair costs, and overall resource demands alongside emerging regulations. Recipients of funding are to use American Iron and Steel; AIS in turn has conducted over 300 training and outreach sessions. The WIFIA program has grown, saving borrowers and creating jobs for projects nationwide; the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act program is to be considered. The SRF database has been modernized and consolidated, and a new system will be in place in 2020. On another note, national aggregate financial audits reveal a $6.8B funding this year towards water quality and water infrastructure projects. See if your state/project may be a similar fit with these 15 exceptional projects. From Dodge City, Kansas, to the Texas Water Development Board, the report highlights the use of funds and their end accomplishments.

Building Green Solutions with EPA’s OSG Program

Click the link below to download the slides from WaterNow's August 24, 2023 webinar, Building Green Solutions with EPA’s Sewer Overflow and Stormwater Reuse Municipal Grant Program. You can watch the recording of the webinar here.

Briefing: Implementing the BIL & Justice40

Member Briefing: EPA's Strategies for Ensuring Equitable Access to SRFs

Click the link below to download the slides from WaterNow's June 15, 2022, member briefing. You can watch the recording here.

 

Briefing: Implementing the BIL & Justice40

Watch WaterNow's June 15, 2022, Member Briefing: EPA's Strategies for Ensuring Equitable Access to SRFs webinar. You can find the slides here.

Private Water Utilities: Actions Needed to Enhance Ownership Data

Private Water Utilities: Actions Needed to Enhance Ownership Data

The roughly 50,000 drinking water utilities in the United States face steep costs—more than $470 billion over the next 20 years, according to EPA estimates—to repair and replace drinking water infrastructure. These costs are passed on to customers through water rates. States regulate the rates charged by privately owned water utilities. EPA has responsibilities to implement programs to further the health protection objectives of the Safe Drinking Water Act.

In this report, GAO reviews private for-profit drinking water utilities and rates. This report examines, among other things, (1) information available from EPA and other sources about the number and characteristics of private for-profit water utilities in the United States, and (2) Drinking Water SRF assistance provided to private for-profit water utilities. GAO reviewed EPA SDWIS data, Drinking Water SRF data, and Global Water Intelligence data, as well as EPA’s and others’ documents. GAO also interviewed EPA and water utility stakeholders.

Click the link below to download the full report.

Webinar Slides: Financing for Innovation

Webinar Slides - Financing Innovation: Colorado State Revolving Fund

The 1-hour, interactive webinar featured the administrators of Colorado’s State Revolving Fund (SRF) loan program and the Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB) to deepen local Colorado water leaders’ understanding of the fundamental mechanics of the SRF program and to dig into the details about how the flexibility of SRF loans can help finance innovative, climate & drought resilient water infrastructure projects. This webinar will also covered the complementary loan and grant programs offered by CWCB. The panelists were:

Click the link below to download the slides from WaterNow's February 10, 2022,  Financing Innovation: Colorado State Revolving Fund webinar.

State Revolving Fund Switchboard

State Revolving Fund Switchboard

The Southwest Environmental Finance Center's State Revolving Fund Switchboard is a repository of all 51 State Revolving Funds' rules, regulations, intended use plans, and other policies that inform how that state administers its SRF. The interactive map, previewed below, allows users to choose which state is of interest and access a compiled set of resources all in one place.

Click the link below to access the resource.

South Carolina GPR Guidance

South Carolina GPR Guidance

Projects that are not considered “categorical” may still qualify for the GPR. Such “business case” projects must be evaluated for their eligibility within one of the four targeted types of GPR eligible projects based upon a business case argument. The business case should provide a cost/benefit analysis, estimated project life and payback period, supporting calculations, and any supporting documentation. See the following excerpt from EPA’s GPR guidance to learn more about how to present a business case for a potential SRF project. Business cases will be approved by the State, required as long as “green projects” are a priority with the EPA. An approved business case must be included in the State’s project files (as of 2013) and contain clear documentation that the project achieves identifiable and substantial benefits. The following sections provide guidelines for business case development.

Oklahoma GPR Checklist

Oklahoma GPR Checklist

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) loan program’s GPR checklist is a tool to aid loan applicants and consultants in determining the green components of any given project, identifying both green performance targets and submittal materials that will be used for the implementation of the green components. It is also a tool to aid OWRB staff in tracking the implementation of the GPR throughout Oklahoma. It is the applicant’s responsibility to obtain the necessary approvals and permits, and to properly design, build and effectively operate and maintain the proposed facilities covered in the Engineering Report (ER) or planning document. Loan applicants should include a completed copy of the checklist with their ER, provided in this report.

Georgia Financing Options

Georgia Financing Options for Conservation Water and Energy projects

The Georgia Environmental Finance Authority (GEFA) works to develop innovative programs to maintain Georgia’s energy, land, and water resources. GEFA also strives to make such initiatives more accessible and financially sound for communities throughout Georgia. Potential water efficiency and conservation projects fall under one of two groups: utility water loss, and end-sue efficiency and conservation. GEFA operates three low-interest loan programs that can be used by local governments to finance a wide range of energy production and conservation projects – the state-funded Georgia Fund, and the federally-funded Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Funds (SRF). See also the possible projects for energy production and conservation, applicable funding, and their financing terms.

Hawaii Priority Criteria

Hawaii Priority Criteria

Hawaii priority SRF applicants must fill out the proposed form. This includes the following sections: water quality protection, green infrastructure, compliance and enforcement, and project need.

New York ISC REQs

New York ISC REQs

The Environmental Facilities Corporation requires ISC grant applicants to provide sufficient information to demonstrate that the proposed green infrastructure (GI) components are feasible to construct as a functional and integrated element of the base program Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) project. The following items related to the GI must be adequately addressed when preparing your Revised Engineering Report: existing conditions, project description, an updated project schedule, cost estimate, anticipated regulatory approval and permits, state environmental quality review, and state historic preservation office review. Also required are concept site plans and site photographs.

Operation and Maintenance of Green Infrastructure Report

Operation and Maintenance of Green Infrastructure Report

The report examines the O&M practices of 22 green infrastructure projects funded by the ARRA CWSRF, and highlights both the opportunities and challenges associated with green infrastructure O&M. Activities examined include planning and tracking of maintenance, training and education, use of partnerships, and funding. 27 percent of percent of projects have tracking systems and 55 percent have accountability mechanisms, while 59 percent have developed training and education related to O&M. Amongst projects surveyed, 36 percent had public-private partnerships fulfilling funding and/or labor for O&M activities. 59 percent of all projects have a dedicated source of funding established. Lastly, the report finds that having a centralized authority to oversee compliance yields optimal maintenance results (which is essential to ESG benefits of green infrastructure and meeting their intended goals). Write out the planned procedure to ensure success. Read on the gray vs. green infrastructure divide, or perhaps on the challenges and opportunities of financing green infrastructure and O&M through the nation’s CWSRF. Touch on how to design with maintenance in mind, reducing the cost of a project over its lifespan.

ARRA GPR Compilation Report

ARRA GPR Compilation Report

ARRA provided funding for a variety of infrastructure projects, including $4 billion dollars of supplementary funding to the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) Programs and $2 billion to the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund. This report was developed for informational purposes with funding made available by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Its contents compile information that has been received by the agency. Divided into 10 regions, the EPA speaks to cities in those states which reside in each region. Each town report covers the primary GRP category, total SRF loan amount, general project description (and environmental benefits) followed by a project narrative and associated costs.

Memo Making Business Cases Not Mandatory

Memo Making Business Cases Not Mandatory

A memo to the CWSRF Chiefs to change to the CWSRF SPR Guidance in 2017, to inform you of a change to the 2012 document that states will no longer be required to establish a “business case” for GPR projects. Originally states were encouraged to exercise due diligence through this requirement; now outdated, states can use the guidance document and their best judgement upon the project eligibility of the GPR provision.

Statement of Policy (Sustainability Policy)

Statement of Policy (Sustainability Policy)

This document provides a Statement of Policy to EPA Regions, States and the general public on how EPA intends to exercise its discretion regarding sustainability. It is sectioned into the following: promoting planning processes that support sustainability, encouraging community sustainability, promoting sustainable water and wastewater systems, targeting SRF assistance, and measuring success. Some highlights include: evaluating barriers to access funding for small and disadvantaged communities, the EPA promising to create a “Best Practices” guide including case studies and lessons learned- from the state pilots and other state SRF programs, and working with industry to develop a methodology to help utilities benchmark their performance based on the attributes and associated best practices and metrics.

Maryland EPA Sustainable Communities Report

Maryland EPA Sustainable Communities Pilot Project Report

Maryland has made efforts to revise its project priority system (how it ranks and then prioritizes projects eligible for CWSRF). It aligns with several goals and actions being advanced at the national level, including those of the HUD‐DOT‐EPA Partnership for Sustainable Communities. CWSRF assistance is now based on these values: public health and water quality; smart growth and sustainability; targeting investments to key watersheds; and cost‐effectiveness. MDE is emphasizing support of cost‐effective infrastructure investments through its revised Integrated Project Priority System (IPSS). Applicants’ project area must be withing a Priority Funding Area (PFA), areas in which state and local governments want to encourage and support economic development and new growth, and consistent with the County Water and Sewerage Plan. This project report includes considerations such as encouraging updating existing infrastructure, improving decentralized system management, and improving coordinated -and long term- infrastructure planning.

 

Utilization of Additional Subsidization Report

Utilization of Additional Subsidization Report

A report to Congress, on the utilization of additional subsidization to ARRA SRF programs year 2010. Find data summarized and analyzed by median household income, the populations served by loans receiving additional subsidization, and the dispersion of these loans by type. The following conclusions come from each state given the flexibility to fund projects based on the public health needs of their state. Transmissions and Distribution was the category with the most projects receiving additional subsidization. Traditionally, 86% of finances have gone to “construction” which includes treatment, transmission & distribution, storage, and source categories. Most FY 2010 loans and additional subsidization recipients fell under the 51-100% range of community Median Household Income (MHI) in respect to state MHI. This means that 75% of loans were made to communities below or equal to the their state MHI. States are thus prioritizing additional subsidization consistent with congressional direction. The majority (58%) of CWSRF loans with additional subsidization served less than 10,000 people. We infer smaller populations more likely to lack the capabilities of larger assistance recipients. Compare Drinking water with Clean Water subsidies and appropriation amounts, for year 2010. In addition to summary analysis, all recipients, communities, population served, and type of assistance are listed.

GPR Crosswalk Table

GPR Crosswalk Table

Under the GPR topics: Green infrastructure, Energy efficiency, Water efficiency, and Environmentally innovative, follow a table visual to determine eligibility. The following are included: whether a business case is required, what is “categorically eligible” and CWSRF GPR Ineligible examples. Section down in columns between 212, 319, and 320 plans of the Clean Water Act (CWA).

2012 GPR Report

GPR Report

Protect clean water, preserve natural systems, reduce energy, and conserve valuable water resources. This report comes from the GPR establishing a minimum 20% of ARRA capitalization funding going to these four categories under GPR. It discusses what has resulted since, including eligibilities in CWSRF that have never been utilized, and addressing the innovative state approaches which have successfully implemented the GPR. Millions of kilowatt hours of energy will continue to be saved annually from ARRA-funded energy efficiency improvements at wastewater treatment plants. This is just one example of the improvements which make reduced operating costs and green house gas emissions also contribute to utility sustainability. Further highlighting done by the EPA and states will help attract new applicants and aid states in identifying future green projects. An example of environmentally innovative activities would be a project that adapts clean water facilities to climate change. Some states solicited GPR recipients to ensure education and awareness of the funding eligibility, establishing new partnerships, and coordinating on local and federal agency levels. Other times, states re-arranged the priority of projects, allowing GPR projects to be funded over previous ranking systems which would bypass GPR projects. To breakdown $1.1 billion in GPR funding, $606 million went to energy, $209 million to green stormwater, $153 million to water efficiency, and $160 million for environmental innovations. All states have met the 20% requirement, most exceeding.

GPR Eligibility Guidance

GPR Eligibility Guidance

Federal goals for green infrastructure, energy efficiency improvements, water efficiency improvements, and environmentally innovative activities are outlined in the following details of the Green Project Reserve (GPR) for the Clean Water SRF program. Read the full report for examples of categorically eligible projects. GPR can be used for planning, designing and building activities, specifically targeting previously rejected or underfunded projects. State SRF programs should follow the criteria to find projects eligible to count toward GPR. Read a definition of green stormwater infrastructure on regional and local levels, followed by unacceptable projects, such as in-line and end-of-pipe treatment systems that only filter or detain stormwater. Water efficiency is the use of improved technologies and practices to deliver equal or better services with less water. Eight project examples are followed by projects that do not meet the criteria, such as agricultural flood irrigation. Energy efficiency, the aim to reduce energy consumption of water quality projects, could be collection system infiltration/inflow detection equipment, for example, but not facultative lagoons. The environmentally innovative section of the criteria include those demonstrating new or innovative approaches to delivering services or managing water resources in a more sustainable way. For example, an integrated water resource management plan likely resulting in a capital project, but not eligible would be air scrubbers to prevent nonpoint source deposition. Learn how to identify projects and write business cases for proof of “green” aspects of a project using the EPA’s guidelines and best practices.

Federal Funding Sources for Water Conservation

Federal Funding Sources for Water Conservation (Appendix E)

Why should we use water efficiently? How can CWSRF programs help systems use water more efficiently... and how do I get funded? How can systems and specific states harness SRF programs for improved water efficiency? What other federal resources are available for this efficiency? Water efficiency saves money, helps communities survive droughts, and reduces water and consumption to protect rivers and therefore wildlife. SRF programs operate like banks offering low or zero interest loans.

Policy Memo to Promote GI

Policy Memo to Promote GI

Aiming to create healthier urban environments, this EPA policy memo by director Andrew D. Sawyers Ph.D. calls to attention the local and national limitations to our current green infrastructure state. Concerning stormwater and other causes of water pollution, since 2009 the EPA has used state revolving funds, currently running 51 CWSRF programs, to sustain long term financing of public and private infrastructure projects. Green infrastructure's reduction of stormwater discharges helps decrease water pollution. Additional benefits include reducing urban heat island impacts, decreasing energy use, and improvin air quality. CWSRF programs have been successful in implementing GPR prjects thus far, alotting $3.8 billion in water reuse, energy efficient equipment, and natural systems for mitigating storm surge since 2010. For best results, the EPA will track states' progress, and recognize high quality successful programs with awards. The EPA recommends incentivizing green infrastructure projects by offering additional subsidization and interest rate reductions, as well as utilizing the prioritization and marketing best practices stated. 

Overview: State Revolving Funds

Overview: State Revolving Funds

The Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) program is a federal-state partnership that provides communities a permanent, independent source of low-cost financing for a wide range of water quality infrastructure projects. The Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) program is a federal-state partnership to help ensure safe drinking water. Created by the 1996 Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) the program provides financial support to water systems and to state safe water programs.

State revolving loan funds can be used to:

control nonpoint sources of pollution

implement water efficiency programs

build decentralized wastewater treatment systems

create green infrastructure projects

protect estuaries

Click here to download a copy of the Environmental Protection Agency's primer on how SRF funds can be used to pay for water efficiency programs

Funding Water Efficiency Through State Revolving Funds

Funding Water Efficiency Through the State Revolving Fund Programs

When water demand is inflated by wasteful water use and water loss, water systems and their customers spend more than necessary in capital and operating costs. Water efficiency and reuse also are important for meeting the environmental goals of many states and communities. The number of water efficiency programs has increased dramatically in the last 10 years, and these programs are now found in almost every part of the United States. The Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) and Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) programs can be important sources of financial assistance to help states and systems initiate a variety of efficiency measures and programs.

Click the link below to download a copy of the Environmental Protection Agency's primer on how SRF funds can be used to pay for water efficiency programs.

California Drinking Water State Revolving Fund

California Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Intended Use Plan

The 1996 amendments to the federal Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) established the national Safe Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) program to finance infrastructure improvements necessary to mitigate drinking water risks to human health. Through capitalization from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) as well as state and revolving fund sources, California’s DWSRF provides financial assistance to public water systems (PWSs) for drinking water infrastructure improvements in the form of low-interest financing, additional subsidy (e.g. principal forgiveness), and other technical assistance. In accordance with federal rules, DWSRF funding is generally prioritized to projects that (1) address the most serious risk to human health, (2) are necessary to ensure compliance with the requirements of the SDWA, and (3) assist PWSs most in need on a per household basis. DWSRF funding is also managed to ensure the timely and expeditious use of DWSRF funds as well as guarantee the perpetuity of the DWSRF for future generations.

This State Fiscal Year (SFY) 2018-19 DWSRF IUP serves as part of the State Water Board’s application for the 2018 Capitalization Grant from the U.S. EPA as well as the guidelines for the State Water Board’s administration of Prop 1 Drinking Water funds. In summary, this IUP establishes the State Water Board’s business plan for the DWSRF program for SFY 2018-19 and discusses the State Water Board’s general approach and ability to successfully carry out that business plan with the available financial and programmatic resources. It also describes how the State Water Board will operate the DWSRF program in conjunction with other funding sources, such as Prop 1 Drinking Water, or sources of funding outside the State Water Board, that may be used to jointly finance projects.

Click the link below to download a copy of the IUP today.

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